Volume 2
- Number 2 (2009)
Volume 3
- Number 1 (2010)
- Number 2 (2010)
Volume 4
- Number 1 (2011)
- Number 2 (2011)
Volume 5
- Number 1 (2012)
- Number 2 (2012)
Volume 6
- 2013
Volume 7
Volume 8
- Number 1 (2015)
- Number 2 (2015)

CALL FOR PAPERS YEAR 2017

IMPORTANT DATES:
Submission Due Date: May 12, 2017
Notification to Authors: May 31, 2017
Journal Publication: July 15, 2017 onwards


EDITORIAL BOARD

Journal of Engineering & Technological Advances
Chief Editor:
Dr. Chia Chee Ming
Deputy Chief Editor:
Dr. Leelavathi Rajamanickam
Editors:
Prof. Omar Munir
Dr. Yap Pow Seng
Pn. Salmaliza Salleh
Mr. Chen Woon Choong
Ms. Kate Lam Woon Yee
 
Asia Pacific Journal of Health Sciences Research
Chief Editor:
Dr Neeraj Malhotra
Deputy Chief Editor:
Prof. Dr. Jamaludin Zainol
Editors:
Datuk Dr Khairiyah Abd Muttalib
Prof. Dr Nyan HL
Assoc. Prof. Tey Kim Kuan
Assoc. Prof. Ong Bee Leng
 
Asia Pacific Journal of Business, Humanities & Education
Chief Editor:
Dr. Mahiswaran Selvanathan
Deputy Chief Editor:
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Stanley Yap
Editors:
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Firdaus Low Abdullah
Dr. Mahadevan Supramaniam
Dr. Chong Wei Ying
Dr. Ramachandran Ponnan
 
 
SHORT COMMUNICATION: VITAMIN C INTAKE IN SMOKERS
Author : Win Maw, Aye Aye Mon, Muhammad Hassanudin Bin Misebah, Sreeram Naidu A/L Rajaram Naidu1, Sutheskumar A/L Letchumanan
Formats available : Flipbook (English)
You have : FREE Access
 
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Read Article Online Download PDF
 
Abstract
Nicotine is the primary component of cigarette smoke which, in sufficient quantities, can affect certain physiological functions of the body. These include euphoria, relaxation, improvement of attention etc. These attributes are probably responsible for the smoking habit of smokers. However, nicotine also produces many undesirable direct and side effects, notably on the central and autonomic nervous systems, including psychic dependence. Cigarette smoke also contains many toxic substances collectively called "free radicals" which cause oxidative stress which leads to damage of cellular functions and serves as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and carcinogenesis. The free radicals are scavenged by "antioxidants", and vitamin C is one of the readily available antioxidants. The present study has revealed that smokers consume relatively less amount of vitamin C from diet and food supplements, compared to non-smokers. Possible reasons for the finding are discussed.
 
Authors(s) Affiliations
Faculty of Medicine, SEGi University College, Selangor, Malaysia.